Is It Time to Leave the Job?

August 13th, 2013

According the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale, changing jobs is one of the highest
life event stressors. Getting fired? Even higher. But knowing when it’s time to
leave and being proactive can reduce that stress and put you in control.

Five warning signs

The foundational warning signs that it is time to  consider leaving your job:

  • Despite your protests to the contrary, your annual evaluation reveals that you are less productive, consistently arrive to work late, call in sick excessively and you are not engaged when you are at work.
  • You know you are unhappy at work and are manifesting your unhappiness in anger and negativity.
  • You’re under-challenged. All efforts to remedy this situation have been met with resistance from your supervisor.
  • Your place of employment fails to deliver on career promises, advancements, training, benefits and financial remuneration.
  • Your core values do not mesh with the company culture.
  • Your current job is no longer on your career path.

Consider your options

The old adage is correct: A job in the hand is worth two in the bush, especially in today’s economic climate.

Decide your next step. Will you quit before you have another job? Will you wait until you have a new position and then give notice? Consider temporary work while you go back to school for a career change?

Review your finances and consider how you will meet your obligations including health insurance and emergencies. Will it be necessary to dip into savings? Write your detailed budget and plan on paper. Consider a thirty day and sixty day plan, followed by a long term plan.

The best scenario is to budget and plan before you quit. Get all your indicators
in place and then set a target date.

How to quit

Timing is everything when it comes to giving notice of your intent to leave the job. Review the company policies for sick and vacation accrual. Time your exit carefully according to anticipated bonuses, paid holidays and other benefits.

Don’t burn bridges by observing these professional guidelines:

  • Give your supervisor notice before you share with coworkers.
  • Provide adequate notice.
  • Maintain a good attitude and continue to give the job one hundred percent.
  • Be prepared to answer the question of why you are leaving in positive manner.

Good planning and professional behavior can ensure you transition out of the old job and into your future smoothly and without stress.

Your goal is to match your skills with the right company. At Olympic Staffing Services that’s our goal, too. Contact us and let’s chat about how we can partner to make that happen.