How to Network Yourself into Your Next Job

July 30th, 2013

We’ve mentioned before that who you know is as important—or more important—than what you know.

U.S. News & World Report, Money, suggests that 80% of available jobs are hidden. What are hidden jobs? They’re job opportunities that are not advertised. So how do you find those hidden jobs?

Networking. It is an opportunity to connect with who you know and who they know.

Online opportunities

The majority of networking is now done online. (See our recent post on the importance of social media.)

Stay active on your social media sites:

  • Maintain an up-to-date online profile.
  • Schedule time to engage. For example: recommend others on LinkedIn, ‘like’ and comment on Facebook, and retweet on Twitter.

Networking online isn’t just about how many followers, circles, friends or contacts you have. It’s about cultivating relationships. While online professional communities provide excellent bridges to contacts, it’s very important to keep this a two way street. Provide your contacts with tips and feedback, and in return you’ll receive them.

Networking events

Don’t be afraid to casually let your friends and family know you’re looking for employment. Then move to local networking opportunities, utilizing business organizations that target your job interests.

Be open to any event where you might make a connection, and develop a relationship that can lead to an open employment door. Don’t forget volunteering. This can often lead to a job opportunity that is only advertised in-house, plus it provides you the opportunity to hone or upgrade your skill-set while helping others.

The best advice is to be genuine. Your passion for your interests and skills will come through without the need to pitch. But when asked, you’ll already have your elevator pitch ready (see our last blog post).

Emailing a connection

Not many of us have time for cold calls or cold emails. That’s why establishing a connection online before that networking email is so important. Remind your contact exactly who you are and your connection level.

Add a connection comment, such as a how you appreciate an article or blog post the person wrote. Or mention a link provided. Then be to the point by asking for advice or direction. (Don’t ask for a job.)

Be respectful of time and say thank you. The best advice is to always behave in an email like you would in person. Professional.

Finally, remember that the essence of networking is building relationships.

We at Olympic Staffing Services can help your job search.  We don’t simply fill positions—we build relationships, taking the time to understand your unique talents and qualifications. Contact one of our seasoned team of staffing professionals to learn more about what Olympic Staffing can offer you.