How to Make Your Business People-Centric

August 8th, 2017

Building a culture within your company that focuses on people as much as it focuses on the bottom line can be a potent tool for improving results. Happier people are more impactful, here are some strategies to make sure you are enhancing your human element:

Give People the Things They Need to Feel Happy

Daniel H. Pink says people are looking for three things from work:  “1. Autonomy – the desire to direct our own lives. 2. Mastery — the urge to get better and better at something that matters. 3. Purpose — the yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves.”

Empower your employees to control their productivity by focusing on results, not micromanaging the process. Offer continuous education and training, so your employees have skills that allow them to produce for you and advance themselves. And don’t forget to reinforce company culture constantly, so employees feel like they are part of an ongoing story, not just a daily grind.

Hold Employees Accountable-and Respond with Rewards  

Pete McGarahan of First American Title talks about making accountability part of a people-centric workplace culture: “They fostered a work environment that motivated everyone to do their best, and made it clear that they all worked as a team through consistent feedback and communication. Their successful, people-centric work environment became self-fulfilling with numbers to reinforce good behavior.”

By holding people accountable for their performance and encouraging their successful performance, you tie their job satisfaction to their ability to deliver for your customers.

Celebrate Success

According to Mary Devine, “people are driven emotionally and seek validation and appreciation more than anything else. Rewards and recognition are not just about giving big bonuses and arranging weekly Friday afternoon drinks, which only drives temporary satisfaction. It’s about celebrating your employees as individuals and rewarding them in ways that make them feel valued.”

Finding ways to constantly build value in people as individuals, builds value in your company and customers by making them feel like every interaction is as important as they are.

If you are looking to move your career to a company that maintains a people-centric culture, contact Olympic Staffing. We have the contacts and experience to place you in a company that shares the same values you have.

How to Attract Millennial Employees

August 1st, 2017

There is an entire cottage industry built around detailing the frustrations some managers have had trying to integrate millennial employees into the workforce. Here’s a wakeup call: By 2020 Millennials are expected to be fully half the workforce. Attracting millennials isn’t an option when filling job openings, it’s a necessity. Here are some basic strategies for sourcing new talent within this demographic group:

Flexibility and compensation Matter

According to Nancy Altobello, the best way to attract and keep the best and brightest is to pay them well. Millennials want choices about how to deliver a job well done. With the understanding that deadlines and client needs must always be met, they want options about where and when they work–and they want their managers clearly on board. People are looking for approval around flexibility.”

Offer Them a Path Forward

Millennials have a reputation for jumping ship. Usually, they do this to advance their career. This is why one of the most potent tools for recruiting and retaining millennials is to offer them a career map that shows them a clear path forward, including development like training and mentorship and clear opportunities for advancement.

Communication is King

Millennials grew up in the social media culture where everything is out there all the time. They require a lot of information, transparency, and opportunities for conversational give and take to feel comfortable. Give this to them.

Don’t just request an interview, send them an information packet with plenty of links to follow up on and include points of communication to ask questions or make comments. Then schedule a follow-up face to face meeting to discuss the job opening.

Use Other Millennials to Recruit Them

Tracking the ways Millennials communicate, learn, and interact is like tracking pop culture – the further away from high school and college the harder it is to keep up.

You need to use employees who are swimming in the same social media waters as them to find out if you are on the right site, using the right hashtags, meeting the right people.

If you are looking for ways to recruit millennial employees, contact Olympic Staffing. We excel in meeting candidates within that group and helping companies put together the kinds of offers that motivate them for the long term.

Providing Employees with Regular Feedback

July 25th, 2017

A lot of companies treat feedback as a yearly ritual. An annual employee review or salary review is formal, nerve wracking, and can become very tense when negatives are covered. Making feedback a regular part of the work environment can defuse the stress that often comes with criticisms and open new opportunities for you to grow as a business. Here’s why you should provide employees regular feedback.

Timing Matters.

Harvey Deutschendorf of Fast Company thinks “the time to give feedback is as soon as possible after a situation or event has occurred.” This is important with negative feedback but also important with positive feedback. You shouldn’t wait to motivate employees or help them improve. Fast feedback is also more effective than the annual sit-down. People learn best when events are fresh in their mind and can apply lessons better.

Feedback Sessions Help You Understand Your Business.

Employees may want to defend themselves or present differing views on situations than your own. This is a positive. Being a good listener helps team cohesion and gives you a chance to learn and grow as a company.

Feedback Is a Form of Training.

Thinking of feedback as a form of criticism is limiting. You should look at feedback sessions as training sessions. Treat them as an opportunity to exchange ideas, train new concepts, and motivate staff. Using feedback sessions to improve performance and leaving each session on a positive with set goals for improvement can create real impacts in your ability to deliver, sell and produce as a business. Cynthia M. Phoel of the Harvard Business Review says you should “approach the feedback session with the goal of getting a complete and accurate picture of the situation.” This will help you be more responsive and fair to your employees.

If you need to hire more employees who will help contribute to your workplace’s internal ability to learn and grow from feedback, contact Olympic Staffing. We are trained to look for potential recruits who have positive outlooks and know the value of constructive workplace dialogue.

Small Companies – Should I Accept their Offer?

July 18th, 2017

When you’re involved in a job search one of the most difficult choices you may have to make is whether to accept an offer from a small company. Big companies have name recognition, entrenched sources of income and heavy management structures that can lead to promotions down the line. Evaluating the pros and cons of a small company is a little more difficult.

Small Companies May Result in Bigger Roles

Big companies can afford to specialize employees, but small companies often take an “all hands on deck” approach to work. This means employees can gain more new experiences in a smaller company. The lack of specialization can be a problem for some employees though. Being pigeonholed as a jack of all trades, master of none in career tracks that value highly specialized skill sets is a real disadvantage that may need to be balanced with learning or certification opportunities to keep employees current.

Smaller Teams.

Smaller companies mean smaller teams are handling projects. This can be a great benefit because you develop a real comfort level with the people around you. As Kate Thora of UpHours notes, “You will see the direct results of your efforts on the company, which gives greater job satisfaction.” Of course, smaller teams can magnify friction between employees when it does occur, and smaller management means the company needs to grow to open up promote from within opportunities.

Innovation.

Small Companies are better at innovating than large ones. Ideas travel through them faster and as Brian Hill mentions, small companies, “can make quick decisions rather than having to maneuver through layers of bureaucracy to proceed with an idea.” On the other hand, big ideas can have big price tags, something larger business can more easily take on without finding expensive investors who will want equity in return.

Whether you choose the small company or the big, contact Olympic Staffing. We specialize in connecting candidates with companies every day.

How to Foster Creativity in Your Job

July 11th, 2017

Some people think creativity requires special skills, training, or talent to come out. Nothing could be further from the truth. Most people are problem solvers with individual thinking. Coming up with creative solutions in the workplace is simply building a process that allows creativity to flourish. Here’s how to foster creativity in your job:

If You Need New Ideas, Ask for Them.

The best way to get people to do something is to ask them. Simple as that. If you want new ideas, put up a whiteboard and tell people to write their ideas on it. Or highlight specific problems and ask people to suggest new solutions within a set time. Meet Advisers founder Adam Fridman notes “in a brainstorming session it often pays to put certain limits in place to help foster innovation, as constraints can actually help people to think more laterally.”

Reward Creativity.

It isn’t enough to ask employees for ideas; they have to see some benefit from the effort. Rewards can be tangible, like a bonus or gift, or recognition of their efforts. The best reward for creativity is often implementing an employee’s ideas and recognizing them for their contribution. This kind of positive affirmation can only encourage others to feel their suggestions will be equally valued.

Diversify Your Office.

Teams of like-minded people will often have a narrow approach to problem-solving because their thought processes are too similar. New perspectives will often foster new ideas by giving you more ways to look at the issue. According to Allison Quirk of State Street Corporation“there’s also a term for this — the Medici Effect, which posits that a diverse team has a better chance of generating groundbreaking ideas thanks to the varying ways it approaches a problem.”

If you need to hire more employees who will help contribute to your companies creative environment, contact Olympic Staffing. We are trained to look for problem solvers who have track records of producing and implementing creative solutions.