Find a Career Mentor

May 2nd, 2017

Whether you’re just starting off in your career or are further down the road, everyone can benefit from a career mentor. A career mentor is someone who can give you guidance, advice, and teach you valuable skills that are directly related to your career of choice. If you’re looking for a career mentor, here’s how you can find one:

Attend Networking Events

Attending networking events in your given field is one of the best ways to find a career mentor. First of all, you’ll be associating with people who are on the same career path as you but who are in different steps of the journey. Try to make an effort to speak to those who have more experience so you can determine whether or not that person would make a good mentor.

Ask a Former Boss

If you have a boss for whom you particularly enjoyed working, consider asking him or her to be your career mentor. The chances are that your boss remembers being in your shoes several years back and would be happy to pass on tips and tricks to help you in your career endeavors. Plus, you already know that the two of you work well together.

Get Recommendations from Family and Friends

If you want a career mentor but don’t know where else to turn, you can always get recommendations from family and friends. There is a good possibility that at least one person you know will have a friend or family member in your chosen profession who would be open to mentoring you. All you would have to do is ask for an introductory call or e-mail to solidify the working relationship.

If you have a career mentor and s/he has hinted that you should find a new job, contact Olympic Staffing. We excel in meeting candidates who are currently transitioning from one role to another or even one field to another. We would love to help you figure out your niche and assist you in obtaining the best position possible in your field.

Be A Team Player!

April 25th, 2017

Every employer wants team players onboard. You know – those individuals who place team goals and accountability higher than their personal agenda. Whether you work alone or in a group; frontline or behind the scenes; cultivating a personal team-player attitude is essential to your career growth and success. Here are ten of the top skills/attitudes/traits that define a true team player.

  1. Communicator: Consistently sharing essential information with each player – and doing it clearly and concisely. When everyone knows what they need to know, everything runs smoother
  2. Active Listener: The second half of communication. Teamwork depends on players who listen, taking the time to understand and consider various points of view – without debating every point.
  3. Avoids Negativity: Stops gossip before it gets a foothold and focuses on the positive angle. If there is an issue – they deal with it face-to-face with tact and honesty.
  4. Trust Builder: Consistently reliable, assessable, and adaptable – a player the team can depend on when things go right and when they go wrong.
  5. Appreciates Diversity: Recognizing that different ideas, methods, cultures, etc. blend to make a better, more complete big picture.
  6. Willing Worker: Accepts assignments and follows through until the end – even when they “drew the short straw.”
  7. Passionate Participator: A self-motivated player with a “can-do” attitude who makes it happen.
  8. Flexible: A player who calmly adapts to changes – even the unexpected.
  9. Deadline Respecter: The guy/gal who finished their responsibilities on time – or early, recognizing that each person’s work affects the rest of the team.
  10. Gives/Receives Praise: Takes the time to recognize and appreciate the accomplishments of others as well as receiving accolades with grace.

Feeling overwhelmed? Relax – you probably already shine on a few of these points. Pick out your weak areas and work on one or two at a time, adding more as you grow. Before long you will gain the reputation of a great team player – just the candidate that our clients are seeking.  Contact Olympic Staffing today – we’ll match your team playing skills with a job where you can thrive.

 

 

 

 

 Make Your Company Meetings More Productive

April 18th, 2017

Company meetings are meant to be productive, but often become frustrating and possibly damaging to your employee culture. As management personnel, it’s your job to make sure company meetings are as productive as possible. Consider the following tips.

 Set an Agenda.

 The first and easiest way to have your company meetings be more productive, is to set an agenda – and send it to those attending.  This also allows your employees to know what to expect. It will also help you stay on topic and fulfill the purpose of the meeting.

 Have Them at the Same Time Every Week.

 If you have regular meetings, holding them at the same time/place every week/month, etc., will increase productiveness.  There are several reasons for this. First, your employees will know to expect this, and therefore, be prepared with questions and feedback in preparation for this meeting. Second, your employees won’t be caught “off-guard,” so they will be more receptive to items discussed in the meeting.

Allow Your Employees to Submit Feedback.

 The last and best way to have your company meetings to be more productive is by allowing employees to submit feedback. A meeting isn’t effective if you’re just talking at your employees the whole time; you should be talking with them.  Allow your employees to submit feedback before the meeting, so you can address their concerns, and seek more feedback during the meeting.

If you’re looking to hire employees who can contribute to or lead meaningful company meetings, contact Olympic Staffing. We can help you find employees who are invested enough in your company that they care about the process and outcome of the company meetings.

How to Deal with a Performance Review

April 11th, 2017

Some jobs issue performance reviews on a regular basis as a way of keeping track and informing their employees how they’re doing in their roles. Anytime you receive a performance review, whether it’s good or bad, you should always take the time to reflect on the information that you’re being given. Here’s how to deal with a performance review:

Pause Before Responding

Before you react positively or negatively, pause and let yourself simmer down (or celebrate) in response to your performance review. This will help you take your performance review in perspective and view it objectively so that you can listen to what your employer is saying.

Look for Constructive Feedback.

Now, take another look at your performance review. However, this time, you need to check for constructive feedback. Constructive feedback can come in the form of suggestions, comments, or notes. It’s important not to get defensive and realize that feedback is usually constructive and voiced with the intent of helping you get better.

Give Yourself Actionable Steps.

Once you’ve taken the feedback into account, you need to give yourself actionable steps to remedy or fix that specific feedback. This can be done mentally or through a list, but we recommend writing these steps down so that you’re more accountable for them and don’t forget the actionable steps.

Be Proud of Yourself!

Most importantly, be proud of yourself after a performance review! No matter the outcome, receiving a performance review means that you have held a job for an extended amount of time and are likely learning the necessary skills and requirements to excel in that particular job. If you received commendations in your performance review for a specific task that you’ve completed, take pride in and build on those traits/skills.

Ready to move on? Contact Olympic Staffing. We can help you take the feedback you received in performance reviews and apply it to helping you find the best job possible for you.

How to Ask for a Reference

April 4th, 2017

If you’re looking for a job, you should have one to three references ready in case your future employer asks for them. If you don’t currently have any references, don’t fret – they’re easy to obtain if you know the right steps. Here’s how to ask for a reference:

Determine Your Past Professional Relationships.

When you ask people for a reference, you need to make sure the people you’re asking are professional references as opposed to personal references. It doesn’t look good if you only list personal references, as your new employer might assume that you have burned bridges with all your past employers. When you’re looking for who to pick, think a manager or superior who was directly impressed by your work.

Put Together as Much Information as Possible.

When you ask a professional connection to be your reference, you need to provide them with as much information as possible, so they’re not caught off guard when your potential employer calls them on the phone. It could be a good gesture to compile information in an e-mail or on paper in regards to what the job is, which of your accomplishments should be highlighted, and what else you want them to address.

Just Ask!

Don’t get hung up on asking other people for a reference because you “don’t want to inconvenience them.” Yes, respect and appreciate their time, but remember that everyone has had to or will have to ask someone else for a reference at some point.  Just do it so you can advance your career as soon as possible.

If you’re happy with your references and are looking for a job, contact Olympic Staffing. We will be able to help you find a job that is a good fit for your current career goals while still taking your past experiences, education, and other factors into account.

Online Reviews – the Negative (Part II)

March 28th, 2017

Last week we discussed the power of positive online reviews and how to generate them. But, there is always the other side of the coin – negative reviews. It happens to every business sometime. In today’s blog we’ll share helpful tips for deflating even the nastiest comment.

One of the best ways to combat negative reviews is to have a good defense…without getting all defensive.

  1. Don’t take it personally. Stay calm, professional, and polite. Reviewers will respect you for that, even if they still disagree.
  2. Designate a person high up in the company to manage reviews. Reviewers want to know that an executive cares about them.
  3. Respond quickly to every Inc.com says, “Businesses that respond to reviews have an 86% higher rating compared to those that ignore them.”
  4. Listen to the reviewer, and examine the problem. If the problem doesn’t exist, provide evidence, and ask the reviewer to remove their review. If the problem is real, thank the reviewer for their feedback and let them know what steps you’re taking to correct the issue.
  5. If this could become a long conversation, ask to move it off the public site. Request that the reviewer email or call you, so you can solve the problem together and in private.

When you show how much you care for reviewers and give personal responses, unhappy reviewers may amend their review after talking with you. Potential talent, as well as your current employees and your customers, are watching to see how you treat people and how you solve problems. Look at negative reviews as an opportunity to demonstrate your professionalism and caring toward other people.

Building a team of caring staff who appreciate the value of great customer service is a positive step toward combatting negative reviews. That’s where Olympic Staffing steps in. Contact us today. We’ll connect you with staff who bring out the best in your company.