Is It Time to Leave the Job?

August 13th, 2013

According the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale, changing jobs is one of the highest
life event stressors. Getting fired? Even higher. But knowing when it’s time to
leave and being proactive can reduce that stress and put you in control.

Five warning signs

The foundational warning signs that it is time to  consider leaving your job:

  • Despite your protests to the contrary, your annual evaluation reveals that you are less productive, consistently arrive to work late, call in sick excessively and you are not engaged when you are at work.
  • You know you are unhappy at work and are manifesting your unhappiness in anger and negativity.
  • You’re under-challenged. All efforts to remedy this situation have been met with resistance from your supervisor.
  • Your place of employment fails to deliver on career promises, advancements, training, benefits and financial remuneration.
  • Your core values do not mesh with the company culture.
  • Your current job is no longer on your career path.

Consider your options

The old adage is correct: A job in the hand is worth two in the bush, especially in today’s economic climate.

Decide your next step. Will you quit before you have another job? Will you wait until you have a new position and then give notice? Consider temporary work while you go back to school for a career change?

Review your finances and consider how you will meet your obligations including health insurance and emergencies. Will it be necessary to dip into savings? Write your detailed budget and plan on paper. Consider a thirty day and sixty day plan, followed by a long term plan.

The best scenario is to budget and plan before you quit. Get all your indicators
in place and then set a target date.

How to quit

Timing is everything when it comes to giving notice of your intent to leave the job. Review the company policies for sick and vacation accrual. Time your exit carefully according to anticipated bonuses, paid holidays and other benefits.

Don’t burn bridges by observing these professional guidelines:

  • Give your supervisor notice before you share with coworkers.
  • Provide adequate notice.
  • Maintain a good attitude and continue to give the job one hundred percent.
  • Be prepared to answer the question of why you are leaving in positive manner.

Good planning and professional behavior can ensure you transition out of the old job and into your future smoothly and without stress.

Your goal is to match your skills with the right company. At Olympic Staffing Services that’s our goal, too. Contact us and let’s chat about how we can partner to make that happen.

 

 

Dealing with Difficult Coworkers

August 6th, 2013

When conflict exists, it shouldn’t be ignored. The key is to remove emotions from the situation and remain professional.

How you react in a conflict situation will be noted by coworkers and supervisors. Look for opportunities to build bridges and relationships instead of allowing conflicts to make you look unprofessional in the workplace.

Conflict resolution

First, step back and review the relationship. Evaluate the interactions, taking ‘you’ out of the equation. Can you change your responses? Can you empathize with your coworker’s point of view? Will taking a few minutes help you calm?

If not, schedule a conversation away from workplace traffic with the coworker in question.

When you sit down to discuss the conflict, remember to be courteous. Take the word ‘you’ out of the meeting. Simply state your observations and then actively listen. Come prepared with solutions and ask for input and ideas to resolve the problem. If you sense the interaction is moving toward confrontation rather than objective conversation, cut the chat short before things escalate to an emotional level.

Taking it to the next level

When direct confrontation fails or isn’t an option, the next step is to schedule an appointment with your supervisor. Have documentation ready instead of generalizing. Present your problem and how it is related to the job (not simply a personality conflict) and be prepared with a solution. Give your employer time to process and act on your complaint. It is okay to inquire about status of a resolution if some time has passed.

Should you find the solution unacceptable, or if nothing has been accomplished, your next recourse is to talk with a representative from Human Resources.

Ask for a copy of the company’s procedure for filing a complaint or requesting mediation. Always document situations with specific dates and the specific details of what occurred, and keep this information for your personal files. Don’t rely on your memory when you sit down with a mediator. Always insist upon on having information documented in your files, and ask to review those files to ensure information is documented correctly.

Your rights

Eleven states have enacted Healthy Workplace Bills to reduce bullying in the workplace. If your coworker situation has escalated to bullying, review the laws in your state. If your coworker problem involves discriminatory practices be sure to review our recent post on Equal Employment Opportunity Laws and the accompanying resource links to further evaluate your recourse.

Ultimately, your goal should be to resolve the issue and move on to facilitate productivity and reduce tension in the workplace.

Olympic Staffing Services monitors what is important to you. We address news and legislation that impacts you. Contact one of our seasoned team of staffing professionals to learn more about what Olympic Staffing can offer you.