Time Management for 2018

January 9th, 2018

Did the close of 2017 catch you by surprise? Are you still holding that list of goals you made in January, and now it’s January again? You are not alone – a lot of people share the same story, but wouldn’t you like to sing a different tune this year? Maybe it’s time for the ABC of time management.

A. Evaluate where you stand right now. For the next ten days, keep a record of all your activities – at work and when you’re off the clock. If possible, do it in 15- 30-minute You don’t have to write a book – just jot a note. The point is to see:

  • Where you’re wasting time
  • When you are your most efficient
  • When the need-a-nap bug hits
  • What activities can be combined
  • What you need to delegate
  • Which activities support your big picture goals – and what doesn’t

B. Create a plan. Use the SMART system – You know: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and, of course, Time-based.

  • Give a swift kick to all your time wasters
  • Schedule specific times for social media, phone calls, etc.
  • Now for the meat of your responsibilities – assign each must do to the best time of day according to your energy, resources, and controlled boundaries.
  • Determine when multi-tasking is efficient (for example folding wash while you listen to your child’s spelling words or planning your meeting agenda while you walk the dog.)
  • On the flip side, eliminate any multi-tasking that hinders your progress.
  • Consider whether you can afford to hire some things done to free your time for something you need to do yourself.
  • Make a “do not disturb” sign and use it

C.  Work the Plan. Begin small, but keep growing. If it’s overwhelming, prioritize – Choose the most crucial area that requires change and focus on that the first month. Track your activities the last three days of the month and compare it to your first record. Note where you have improved. It will give you courage to work on another area. By the time December 2018 arrives, you’ll be a time-management pro.

Is a job-change part of your solution? Consider Olympic Staffing. Together we can create a strategy that leverages your career goals, education, and work experience. We work with a variety of companies and industries to maximize your exposure and opportunities. Helping you achieve your career goals is our priority. Contact us today.

Companies and Cell Phone Policies

January 2nd, 2018

Establishing a cell phone policy that respects employees while preventing disruption of productivity, encouraging a safe environment, and protecting company data isn’t easy. It’s downright complicated, but it’s a responsibility that cannot be ignored. Here’s some tips to help you get started.

Policies that work well for most companies –guidelines based on basic good manners and consideration of others.

  1. Keep phones on vibrate while at work.
  2. Make/take personal calls/texts during breaks and lunch time, excluding emergencies, medical calls, etc. Ensure that family and friends understand when calls are acceptable and when they are not.
  3. When calls must be made; keep them brief. If your call will disrupt others; step outside or into a private area.
  4. Keep all calls “professional” including personal calls – no arguments, foul language, intimate details . . .
  5. Never let cell phone use interfere with safety.
  6. Don’t use phones to take pictures during work.
  7. Don’t use personal cell phones to transmit confidential company information.
  8. Never let cell phone use interfere with customer service. If an employee who works with customers has an emergency, another coworker should immediately take the employee’s place.

Some companies – especially those with lots of customer contact, may find the need to ban cell phones while on the job, while others may have a very loose policy. The key is to have a policy.

  • Put it in writing.
  • Clearly communicate the policy to all employees.
  • Set specific expectations and consequences for policy breakers.
  • Enforce the policy consistently and fairly.

 

While most agree that companies need a cell phone policy – the big question remains – what should that policy be? Businesses come in various sizes and cultures. Likewise, with employee responsibilities. On the one hand, there are some policies, like those mentioned above, that make work well across the board. On the other hand, one size does not fit all – so in the end, common sense must come into play.

If you’re looking for a new employee, contact Olympic Staffing. We can help you find an employee in sales or any department, who is perfect for your company culture and who will be a good fit for your fellow employees.